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The humanities are a window into the deepest aspects of the human condition, those things that persist across time and cultures. They familiarize us with the language of emotion and motivation, and the areas of human life that defy quantification. And, despite the claim that studying the humanities is impractical, they develop habits of shrewd observation, thoughtful understanding, and clear expression that are invaluable in every walk of personal and professional life. 

In this age of reality TV, inch-deep internet analysis, and glib sound bites, we applaud Humanities Washington for supporting these timeless lessons.

Bruce Shepard
President, Western Washington University
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David B. Williams

"Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology in Washington State"

Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology in Washington State

David B. WilliamsGeology affects us every day, from wars fought over fossil fuels to roads on glacial carved hills to great tragedies such as the Indonesian tsunami. And yet, many of us feel separated from the geology around us. Geologist David B. Williams will use local buildings and structures – and the stone they’re made from – to spark a discussion on how geology connects to our communities. By considering the rocks and stones we pass each day, we can recognize the connections we have with the larger geologic world around us. For example, in Seattle we can explore stone ranging from 3.5 billion to 120,000 years old, fossils the size of a cinnamon roll and rock used by the Romans for the Coliseum. This conversation will prompt us to slow down, to observe more carefully, ask questions, dive into history and find connections.

 

About David B. Williams

David B. Williams is a freelance writer focused on the intersection of people and the natural world. His books include Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban GeologyThe Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City and his latest, Cairns: Messengers in Stone. Williams also works at the Burke Museum and is a former National Parks ranger in Utah and Massachusetts. He maintains the blog GeologyWriter.com.

Williams currently lives in Seattle.

For more information on how to book a speaker, please contact Zaki Abdelhamid at (206) 682-1770 x102 or by email.

 

2012-14 Speakers Bureau: David B. Williams from Humanities Washington on Vimeo.

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