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Few states in the nation are as culturally, economically, politically, and geographically diverse as Washington. Those differences often generate what appears to be an insurmountable divide. Yet, since 1973, Humanities Washington has shown in profound and poignant ways our commonality as a people. Regardless of where we live, Asotin or Neah Bay, Ilwaco or Metaline Falls, we share the same dreams for a better world for ourselves and our descendants. The programs of Humanities Washington remind us of those common dreams.

Quintard Taylor
Scott and Dorothy Bullitt Professor of American History University of Washington
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David B. Williams

"Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology in Washington State"

Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology in Washington State

David B. WilliamsGeology affects us every day, from wars fought over fossil fuels to roads on glacial carved hills to great tragedies such as the Indonesian tsunami. And yet, many of us feel separated from the geology around us. Geologist David B. Williams will use local buildings and structures – and the stone they’re made from – to spark a discussion on how geology connects to our communities. By considering the rocks and stones we pass each day, we can recognize the connections we have with the larger geologic world around us. For example, in Seattle we can explore stone ranging from 3.5 billion to 120,000 years old, fossils the size of a cinnamon roll and rock used by the Romans for the Coliseum. This conversation will prompt us to slow down, to observe more carefully, ask questions, dive into history and find connections.

 

About David B. Williams

David B. Williams is a freelance writer focused on the intersection of people and the natural world. His books include Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban GeologyThe Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City and his latest, Cairns: Messengers in Stone. Williams also works at the Burke Museum and is a former National Parks ranger in Utah and Massachusetts. He maintains the blog GeologyWriter.com.

Williams currently lives in Seattle.

For more information on how to book a speaker, please contact Zaki Abdelhamid at (206) 682-1770 x102 or by email.

 

2012-14 Speakers Bureau: David B. Williams from Humanities Washington on Vimeo.

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